Show Me The Way Blog

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Scholarships set to delve into the heart

Story courtesy the Koori Mail

Western Sydney University and GE Healthcare will offer a scholarship for Indigenous people looking to enrol in the university's Graduate Diploma of Cardiac Sonography.

Valued at $10,000 a year over the two years of the degree, the scholarship will provide financial help for the students studying how to use ultrasound acquired images to identify and measure heart disease.

School of Medicine dean Professor Annemarie Hennessy says the scholarship will provide much-needed assistance for Indigenous students who may otherwise lack the means to pursue tertiary education.

“Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of death in Australia, and diagnosing and properly treating existing conditions will make a big difference to the health outcomes of the region, and also the nation,” she said.

“It is our hope these scholarship recipients will not only help combat cardiovascular disease in Australia, but also to one day become medical leaders in the community.”

GE Healthcare president Matt Tucker said there already was a higher than acceptable prevalence of Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.
“We hope that the skills learned at Western Sydney University bring a positive change to this situation,” Mr Tucker said.

For more information, email scholarships@westernsydney.edu.au


The Koori Mail is a media partner of Show Me The Way


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Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Aunty Joyce celebrates education

Story courtesy the Koori Mail

At the age of 68, Aunty Joyce Summers completed a degree in Indigenous Studies.

It’s because of her passion for education that the Gold Coast Aboriginal Elder has been recognised as a Bond University fellow.

Aunty Joyce received the honorary title from the Gold Coast-based university in recognition of her significant contribution, particularly in the development of Bond's Nyombil Indigenous Support Centre. 

Born on Ukerabah Island, an Aboriginal reserve on the Tweed River, Aunty Joyce was involved in the community fight to save the island from development, alongside her brother Cedric Morgan and the late Senator Neville Bonner, Australia's first Indigenous Member of Parliament.

She was chair of Gold Coast City's NAIDOC) celebrations in 2015 and has received a Premier's Award in recognition of her community work.

Aunty Joyce said she looked forward to continuing to work with Bond University and its growing Indigenous student group.

"I think it is wonderful that Bond has so many Indigenous students studying here, and such a high retention rate of these students," she said.

"I'm a humble person. You do things out of the goodness of your heart and don't expect accolades, but I feel truly honoured to be recognised as a fellow of Bond University."

Bond vice-chancellor Tim Brailsford said Aunty Joyce had been instrumental in the support and growth of the Nyombil centre, including mentoring Bond's Indigenous students.

"Aunty Joyce has helped establish many committees and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations on the Gold Coast and is an advocate for the healing of relationships between Indigenous peoples and others through understanding and tolerance," he said.

"She is committed to the advancement of Indigenous people and places a high value on the importance of education. She has always made herself available to the university, and indeed myself, to give spiritual advice and guidance on the ways and culture of Indigenous people."
Aunty Joyce Summer


The Koori Mail is a media partner of Show Me The Way


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Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Dodson quits AIATSIS post

Story courtesy the Koori Mail

MICK Dodson has has stepped down from the helm of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Studies (AIATSIS).

The Indigenous affairs champion served for more than a quarter of a century on the organisation’s council, the past 17 years as chairperson.

“I step down confident the future of AIATSIS is in safe hands,” the Yawuru man said.

“The appointment of a new chief executive offer, Craig Ritchie, recent funding allocations and passing of amendments to the AIATSIS Act 1989 provide renewed purpose for our
50-year-old institution.

“It has been a privilege to serve the Australian people including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in my role, and an honour to witness and guide the growth of AIATSIS into the world-renowned research, collecting and publishing institution it is today.

“AIATSIS is the custodian of knowledge, history and heritage of the oldest continuing culture on earth. It is intrinsic to our national identity.

“From language to dance, music to art, songlines to stories, AIATSIS has a central role in making sure that’s available not just to present generations but to future generations.”

Professor Dodson paid tribute to the staff at AIATSIS, saying their dedication and professionalism never ceased to astound him.



Source: The Koori Mail

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Wednesday, May 31, 2017

NT boarding facility at Nhulunbuy

Story courtesy the Koori Mail

A NEW boarding centre aimed at improving the education of Indigenous students in the north-east Arnhem Land has been opened. Northern Territory Education Minister Eva Lawler said the $20 million ‘Dawurr’ boarding facility, at Nhulunbuy High School, will provide students and their parents with the choice of schooling closer to home.

“This is an exciting time for Nhulunbuy. Dawurr gives students and their parents a choice closer to home and also creates ongoing jobs through education and operational needs,” she said.

The boarding facility has one-, two- and four-student bedrooms, a commercial kitchen and dining room, tuition rooms, a multi-purpose art and music centre, amphitheatre as well as sporting facilities and open-plan gardens.

“This facility enables boarding students to access a range of subjects and opportunities through the school, such as maritime studies and tourism that would not be available in small remote locations,” Ms Lawler said.
Nhulunbuy High School principal Sabina Smith said a committee was established to provide expert advice and guidance on the centre.

“The consultation process, facilitated by the Yothu Yindi Foundation, has allowed the community and stakeholders to guide all aspects of how the facility will operate,” she said.

Source: The Koori Mail

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Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Broncos score academy support

Story courtesy the Koori Mail

THE Federal Government has allocated $5 million to support an additional 1000 places in the Beyond the Broncos Girls Academy for Indigenous girls in northern NSW and southern and western Queensland.

Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion said the funding would also provide continued support for the existing 300 places already part of the program.

“The Beyond the Broncos Girls Academy is a great program that provides Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander girls with an opportunity to be mentored and encourages increased school attendance while building leadership skills and developing career pathways to further education and employment," he said.

“Investing in the future of women and girls has a significant benefit not only to them as individuals but also for their family and broader community.”

Broncos chief executive Paul White said the funding was “a wonderful affirmation of the Beyond the Broncos Girls Academy program. The club is very proud of the work the program is doing to empower young women both academically and in their lives, and is looking forward to partnering with the Government to expand those opportunities.”


Source: The Koori Mail

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Indigenous Digital Excellence (IDX) Awards

17-Aug-2017

The inaugural national Indigenous Digital Excellence (IDX) Awards have been launched with a mission to uncover everyday digital excellence and inspire Indigenous entrepreneurs, businesses and young people.

To be held at the National Centre for Indigenous Excellence (NCIE) on the 29 September 2017, the national awards will showcase IDX to corporate Australia.

Read More

Curriculum revamp

THE draft Australian Curriculum attempts to move beyond, rather than entrench, a ‘black armband’ view of history, according to Aboriginal educator Chris Sarra.

Read More